Rage Gauge!

Rage Gauge is a mobile game developed in Unity as part of my final year team project module, take a look:

The objective of the game is to destroy as much as possible while avoiding collisions with any police obstacles.

Rage Gauge won third place for Best Game Design in the 2014 Game Republic student showcase. More information can be found on the Game Republic website.

I had many key roles in the development of the game.

Level Editor
One of my largest tasks was developing tools inside the Unity Editor that could be used to develop level segments (known as ‘chunks’) in the game, and maintain the documentation for it. The tool was designed so everything about how the levels spawns could be controlled from outside the codebase, including creating biomes (sections that only used certain chunks during that biome), creating predefined “Super Chunks” (a series of chunks that always spawn in the same order) and controlling the random creation of obstacles and collectibles on chunks, including the probability of any given obstacle spawning.

Parts of the Chunk Editor

Parts of the Chunk Editor

If you would like more detail information on how the editor works, check out the documentation which you can read here.

Game Play
I created many areas of the game play. The most important being the player Monster Truck movement and handling how it should collide with solid obstacles in a way that didn’t disrupt game play. I also worked on a few obstacles such as the Flash Bang and the Crane as well as other areas such as particle systems and the random generation of the endless level. As well I designed and created every chunk as well as all the OBS files in the demo using the Chunk Editor.

Performance
I also took a role of performance optimizing for the game looking for ways to improve the performance. I worked closely with the design team advising the use of Texture Atlases for there models, as well as general techniques to lower render calls and profiled the game looking for areas of the code base that were more intensive than necessary.

This entry was posted in Unity.